Who Invented School?

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who invented school

At the age of 4 or 5, we enter a completely different world. Every student looks like in the same school uniform. Students seek education from learned professionals. There is a particular system of education that operates the whole school. Initially, learning is fun. But with upgrading class, the syllabus becomes vast, and we curse the person who invented school.

Eventually, students try to escape school and the different systems that pressurize us. This awakes a wild hunt within us of the person who’s the root cause of all evils. Here is a brief history of how school was discovered and came into existence.

Horace Mann: the Legend Who Invented the School System

Horace Mann, born in 1796 in Franklin, Massachusetts, is believed to have invented the school system we all know today. He took the role of both a college professor and a college president who taught Latin and Greek. As he became Secretary of Education in 1837, he initiated forward his theory for a system of acknowledged teachers who would teach students an organized curriculum of basic content. For this reason, Mann is often designated as the “Father of the Common School Movement.”

Several other states quickly followed Mann’s system he instituted in Massachusetts.
Another man who is assumed to have invented the school is Harry P. School. Around 1369, he started accumulating neighborhood children with unacceptable behavior and locked them up in a building. In different words, his “school” was a place where children underwent punishment. His way of educating was probably harsh, but the parents of the punished children liked his approach.

But, Harry P. School is not the originator of school. However, his approach to educate students with his strange trick played as a step-stone to the invention of school wherein education spread in the correct way possible.

By 1918, every state asked students to complete elementary school. Educational advancement grew by leaps and bounds during the 20th century, leading to the advanced systems we enjoy today.

Our education systems might not be that appealing. But, we get to learn so much more in this world in a cubicle. We develop stronger bonds; learn patience, punctuality, cleanliness, values, discipline, and much more. School is the temple of learning which ought to grow within us the seed of values.